Category: Walking the territory

Website of poet Elizabeth Rimmer

The Occasional Tang of Salt

At sixty miles distance, this village where I have lived for thirty years is about as far from the coast as you can get in Britain. It wasn’t always so. About 10,000 years ago, when the last ice melted, there was a long sea loch here which stretched another twenty miles inland, and the fossilised remains of whales were found just up the road, near where the famous battle of Stirling Bridge took place.


September 30, 2019 0

Saving Seeds

We have got to the time of year when the mornings are dewy and the last flowers are making a brave show amid the wreckage of summer. This seems to have happened very fast. Last week, there was a magnificent array of marigolds and the first sprays of montbretia around the pond. This week there…
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September 12, 2019 0

Picking Up

When you start to see this, you know that summer is almost over. The crocosmia – which comes back no matter how hard you try to thin it out – justifies its presence in the garden when the garden takes a deep breath after the summer pause, and begins to think about autumn. The weather…
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August 22, 2019 0

High Summer

now is the time when you start to reckon up, and think about the next year. As I go through the harvest, drying herbs, freezing tomato sauce, and trying new dye plants, I’m beginning to think – but what next? is this doing what I expected? what will the garden need from me next year?


July 24, 2019 0

The Bees

There are about five bees here, all enjoying yesterdays sunshine. There are three carder bees and two white-tailed bumble bees. I’m think this is a hairy-footed flower bee. I suspect there may be miner bees here too. We used to have them in our walls a few years ago, and they were quite disconcerting as…
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June 5, 2019 0

Bringing in the Summer

We have had erratic weather, sometimes very warm, sometimes cold and windy, a lot of sunshine, a bit of cloud, but on the whole, not enough rain. The garden is unusually dry, and what is particularly annoying, it has done nothing to discourage those well-known wet-lovers, slugs and horsetails, which are flourishing mightily. Fortunately, so…
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May 24, 2019 0

Bluebells at Inchmahome

We always try to go to Inchmahome in spring to see the bluebells. They can be up to three weeks behind us here at a much lower level, so it’s a guess when the best time is, but this year, I think we hit peak bluebell. They are everywhere under the trees I took the…
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May 1, 2019 2

Frost in the Territory of Rain

This is the new camera. I’m calling it the beast because it is so much bigger than I thought it would be. And, beside it, its little sister, the compact. One unexpected spin off from getting the beast is that the manuals tell me so much about getting the best out of little sister, and…
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January 23, 2019 0

Lost Connections

These are my local hills, the Ochils, stretching out as far as Perth, marking the boundary with Fife. They have been on the edge of my horizon for thirty-six years, and though I am not a hill-walker, they have fed my imagination all that time. Stories of historic battles, witches, artists, farmers, and silver miners,…
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November 14, 2018 0

The Territory of Summer

This is no longer the territory of rain – at least for now. There hasn’t been a summer like this since about August 1994 – which is when I wrote a journal post that became this: Sunlight hits a blow to the head, and the sky is molten, carved by the screaming flight of swifts…
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June 28, 2018 0