Monthly Archives: July 2009

neo geo-poetics3

Two writers stand out for me from the Atlantic Islands Festival as significant pointers for the way forward for geopoetics. These are Norman Bissell, whose book Slate, Sea and Sky formed the basis for Mark Sheridan’s Atlantic Island Suite, and Jamie Whittle, an environmental lawyer who wrote about all aspects of the Findhorn in his… Read More »

neo-geo-poetics 2

The big question about geopoetics is: Is it the work of Kenneth White, and therefore absolutely and exactly just what he says it is, or is it something bigger, broader, and more generally applicable? What I mean is, is it like the theory of evolution or psychoanalysis, which depended on Darwin, Freud and Jung for… Read More »

neo-geo-poetics

Although the thing I was at last week was called the Atlantic Islands Festival, it was also the summer school for the Scottish Centre for Geopoetics, and many of the speakers talked about the impact of geopoetics, and in particular the work of Kenneth White on their particular discipline and artistic practice. We struggled, though,… Read More »

Atlantic Islands Festival

This was a big event, which I have already mentioned on Luchair (my keyboard isn’t recognising accents this morning!), and which will have ongoing resonances with a lot of my work over the next few months. There was a lot of interesting work in many genres and media, but particularly impressive were Richard Ashrowan’s lovely… Read More »

Gillian Clarke: A Recipe for Water

Life is too short to review books you don’t like, so you can take it as read that this is good poetry. It’s lucid and serene, attentive and intelligent. It deals with water as sea, snow glacier and river, and talks incisively about global warming without a lot of finger-pointing and shouting. Look at this… Read More »